August 20, 2021

A new study finds that children who are diagnosed with mental illness are more likely to be placed in special education and that they are more apt to exhibit symptoms that are considered “negative symptoms.”

“If we see an individual with a negative symptom, then we are very likely to ask the question, ‘Is there anything that could be done to help that person?'” said Dr. Michelle S. Tewksbury, lead author of the study.

The study, published in the journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, looked at the mental health of 3,906 children from three different states, ages 4 to 17.

The children were randomly assigned to either the mental well-being group or the cognitive impairment group.

The cognitive impairment patients were more likely than the mental ill-health patients to be in special schools.

According to the study, children in the cognitive impairing group were more than four times more likely and had a prevalence of 15.5 percent.

The study authors theorize that this group of children may be at greater risk of developing mental illness as adults.

They also found that children in cognitive impairment groups were more apt than children in other groups to have behavioral problems, including behavior problems, aggression, hyperactivity, hypervigilance, and hyperfocus.

The researchers believe the more mental health a child has, the more likely they are to have problems with school and peers, which may make it more difficult for them to be successful.

In addition, children who had symptoms of mental illness were more prone to developing symptoms in later life, the study found.

The finding is consistent with studies showing that the more children with mental illnesses are placed in preschool, the greater the risk of their developing mental illnesses.

“There is a growing body of evidence showing that preschool-age children with symptoms of depression are more vulnerable to subsequent depression and substance use disorders,” said Dr Tewsbury.

“So the question is, why is it that preschool children with more severe symptoms are more prone?”

The researchers plan to continue their research to determine whether other childhood disorders, such as autism, affect children’s mental health and the impact that mental health conditions may have on their later life.”

This finding could help to prevent mental illness in these young children and help to reduce the stigma associated with mental disorders.”

The researchers plan to continue their research to determine whether other childhood disorders, such as autism, affect children’s mental health and the impact that mental health conditions may have on their later life.